sourcingthestones

sourcingthestones

stanton drew stone circles

I have been researching the Stanton Drew Stone Circles for a number of years both as an individual and with members of the Bath and Camerton Archaeological Society. The stones seen at Stanton Drew are varied and include, among other rock types; silicified Dolomitic Conglomerate, Oolitic Limestone and Sandstone. The question is; from where were these various stone types sourced?

Pole photography

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Thu, December 29, 2016 07:49:42

28th December 2016:

I've put together a rig for pole photography comprising a 5-metre telescopic aluminium pole, Olympus TG-4 camera and using Olympus Share app on my Samsung smartphone, and today was it's first trial use.

Where better to go than over to Stanton Drew Great Circle. The low mist in the valley had lifted and the sun was shining.

Perhaps the sun was shining a little too brightly as it was casting some rather long shadows, but the resulting photographs do give a different perspective of the stones.

The images were all taken to the north-east side of the Great Circle where the Avenues are to be found.






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Geophysical surveying at Stanton Drew

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Tue, October 11, 2016 08:19:46

30th September-3rd October and 7th-10th October 2016: with Bath and Camerton Archaeological Society (BACAS).

Spent a few days with BACAS carrying out geophysical survey of two sites in Stanton Drew. the first location was at Tithe Barn fields, just off Sandy Lane (image above) where resistivity and magnetometer surveying was done. Before the survey could be carried out there was a lot of moving of electric fences required as the fields were split into paddock areas for horses and ponies. The site itself slopes downwards to the north from Sandy Lane towards the River Chew where a former mill and associated leats is located. The underlying geology on the higher ground comprises bedrock of Mercia Mudstone Group of Triassic Age this if overlain on the lower river valley by superficial deposits of Alluvium - clay, silt, sand and gravel of Quaternary age. Some of the survey results might reflect this changing geology.

The second site of interest was the field opposite the Druids Arms public house (image below). This surprisingly elevated situation had extensive views (if the buildings were removed) of the stone circle sites and Maes Knoll is easily visible. Again carried out resistivity and magnetometer survey although unable to finish all the resi in the time allowed. There has been some previous work carried out c.1996 but only an interpretation remains as the raw data has been lost.

A full report of the geophysical will be produced at a later date so I will not provide any interpretation of the results here.




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Sourcing the stones

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Fri, January 01, 2016 09:58:10

Some thoughts written a while ago on the origins of the stone types found at the Stanton Drew monument site.

Simmonds, V.J. An introduction to Stanton Drew Stone Circles_Sourcing the stones.





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Probing the Big Ground

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Sat, March 14, 2015 07:18:17
Report on the fieldwork carried out at Stanton Drew during February and March 2014 and other related activities. Part of the Stanton Drew Survey (low res version).

pdf

Simmonds, V., Oswin, J and Richards, J. 2015. Probing the Big Ground: Quoit Farm, Stanton Drew, February/March 2014 and related work at Stanton Drew. Bath & Camerton Archaeological Society.



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Big Ground Mound

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Wed, January 21, 2015 17:16:05
The Bath and Camerton Archaeological Society (BACAS) report on the fieldwork carried out in 2013 at the Big Ground Mound, Stanton Drew. Part of the Stanton Drew Survey.

pdf


Richards, J., Oswin, J. and Simmonds, V. The Big Ground Mound and other archaeological investigations at Quoit Farm, Stanton Drew, 2013 (Low Res Version) BACAS



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Hautville's Quoit

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Wed, January 21, 2015 17:15:06
The Bath and Camerton Archaeological Society in collaboration with Bath and Northeast Somerset Council report on the fieldwork carried out in 2012 at the site of Hautville's Quoit, Stanton Drew.Part of the Stanton Drew Survey.

pdf

Richards, J., Oswin, J. and Simmonds, V. Stanton Drew Surveys, 2012. Hautville's Quoit and other archaeological investigations. BACAS in collaboration with BANES.



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Stanton Drew 2010

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Wed, January 21, 2015 17:13:35

The Bath and Camerton Archaeological Society in collaboration with Bath and Northeast Somerset Council report on the fieldwork carried out in 2010 at the site of Stanton Drew Stone Circles. Part of the Stanton Drew Survey.

pdf

Simmonds, V.J. The Geology and the Landscape in Oswin, J., Richards, J. and Sermon, R. 2011 Stanton Drew 2010: geophysical survey and other archaeological investigations. BACAS and BANES.



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Lichens

NotesPosted by Vince Simmonds Sat, January 21, 2012 16:54:39

I have often wondered whether lichens might be studied to give some indication of a stones origins. Lichenometry is a geomorphic method of geochronologic aging that uses lichen growth to determine the age of exposed rock: lichens are presumed to increase in size radially at specific rates as they grow. Measuring the diameter of the largest lichen of a species on a rock surface can therefore be used to determine the amount of time that the rock has been exposed. Lichen can be preserved on old rock faces for up to 10,000 years, providing the maximum age limit of the technique, though is most accurate (within 10% error) when applied to surfaces that have been exposed for less than 1000 years. The use of lichenometry is of increased value for dating deposited surfaces over the past 500 years as radiocarbon dating techniques are less efficient over this period (Wikipedia 21.01.2012).

These images were taken in February 2011 at the boulder fields, Garrow.

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